Yaccomaricard's Kazumi Umezawa on the concept behind the Autumn/Winter collection.

We talked to Kazumi Umezawa Yaccomaricard’s planning director based at the Tokyo headquarters about the new autumn and winter season ahead.

 

 

Tell us a little about the autumn/winter collection.

 

We were still in the middle of the global pandemic when we started this collection.

It was when even the postponed Tokyo Olympics were in serious jeopardy, and there was a sense of closure.

I remember that we were struggling with how we could design a collection that would best express this period in time. We realised that we needed it to convey a message of courage, energy and strength and to be forward-looking. We thought about our future lives and how to enjoy them more. The collection was created with the idea of enjoying the autumn and winter season to the fullest, and that’s how we came up with the Winter Wonderland concept.

We took ideas from majestic snow-capped mountains and wild winter landscapes, the beauty, the harshness, and their depth and texture.

The new techniques, designs and colours were chosen to uplift and evoke positivity.

 

Please explain the Winter Wonderland concept.

 

The collection was designed to express depth, layers and three-dimensionality.  

The pops of colour amongst the collection are bold; we wanted them to specifically contrast with white snow, the sight of which oozes positivity and fun. We have a mix of athletic designs that express an active, sporty feel and relaxed loungewear, with an emphasis on comfort.

 

 

What’s new in the collection?

 

Because we wanted a three-dimensional feel to our techniques this season, we created a handwoven basketweave detail with depth and texture. We made a shirt, top dress and a tote bag featuring this work. We worked with a quilted wool jersey that took on dye colour differently from the cotton it is placed on, which gives each shirt a tonal depth that would be missing if it was all one cut from one fabric.

We implemented a boutis technique that meant filling the inside of pintucks to give them extra warmth and tactility.     

These quilting techniques give a three-dimensional feel and create an interesting uneven texture.

 

 

How should it be worn?

 

We have put together a unique winter layering experience.

By layering, you can create different moods and enjoy experimentation with colour coordination. It’s an opportunity to be playful.

We have introduced items that expand the appeal of a shirt, like a fine wool turtleneck that can be worn underneath. We also worked on making a slim-fit cotton jersey top that could still show pintucking but with less bulk to allow layering. We developed a chain stitch that allows for a slim pleat, moderate stretch and a more fitted silhouette.

The quilted nylon scarf and bag are coordinating accessories that can be worn over any outfit to create an energetic style with a little edge.

We like to think about the accents of layering, like the pop of a collar worn under knitwear, which led us to a fresh take on a box pleat collar that looks like a frill. To create a playful jacket, we added zips to the side so you can show off what’s underneath.

 

 

 

Any personal highlights?

 

We put a lot of care into every item, which is the result of many hands.

I like how we made each piece coordinate to create a cohesive look, but each piece retains its own personality and presence.

We have taken on some bold challenges in the techniques and mixing of materials. There are still challenges to be taken on; there is an opportunity to challenge ourselves more and not be bound by common sense.

We hope you like the collection, feel uplifted by it and that it gives you the power to be yourself.

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